Innovative Protest By Women Farmers Demanding Fair Price For Their Produce

According to this article, there are nearly 98 million women who work in agriculture in India. Yet they do not have the rights or access to markets that they have been promised and that will help make their work dignified. Women who adopt the System of Rice Intensification and other improved farming techniques can produce the food, but they need policy support to see their work reaping the dividends it should.

See original article from The Logical Indian

Their protest is not a general sit-in demonstration. The women are seen carrying the commodities in a basket on their head. The products are necessarily the ones whose MSP is less than the cost of production. They have been in conversation with CACP officials, but no action has been taken.

So, today, they gathered in front of the gates of the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ welfare to draw public attention.

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Women farmers need policy attention

by Hema Swaminathan
The Hindu Business online

With men migrating to cities for better jobs, women are now playing a critical role in farming, but they face many odds

Women have made significant contributions to agriculture in India. The current situation of rural transformation has brought to light women’s roles in agriculture. Typically, any discussion on this topic tends to focus on the most obvious trends; the proportion of women working in the agricultural sector as self-employed, unpaid help or wage labour.

What is ignored is an important and interesting shift in women’s roles: women are increasingly participating in farms as managers and decision-makers.

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‘Emissaries of Empowerment’ – paper

by Kate Cronin-Furman, Nimmi Gowrinathan , & Rafia Zakaria

The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, The City College of New York

What’s the problem with chickens and sewing machines?
We argue that they are hallmarks of an approach that fails to grapple with non-
Western women as full subjects and instead collapses their identity to the
circumstances of their victimhood. Empowerment programming is explicitly

depoliticizing, obscuring women’s relationships to power and the state.

 

A must-read article on how the idea of ’empowering’ women from the Global South has become precisely not about that … Read the article here

 

 

 

These Brave Women Running Rural India

By Moin Qazi, Daily O (See original article)

Women are the mainstay of small-scale agriculture, the farm labour force and day-to-day family subsistence. The biggest myth is that the rural woman is part of her land’s wealth. Yes, but only to the extent of generating it. They don’t own land but produce secondary crops, gather food and firewood, process, store and prepare family food and fetch water for the family.

On average, women spend about twice as much time as men doing the unpaid work that makes life possible for everyone, like cooking, cleaning and caring. As a result, women have no time to finish their education, learn new skills. The fact that the potential of so many women is going unrealised is a tragedy – but it’s also an opportunity. Girls and women aren’t just the faces of the poverty; they’re also the key to overcoming it.

The Indian woman has moved out from the kitchen, only to be shackled by other obstructions such as inheritances laws for agricultural land in favour of men, preference for sons, patrilocal marriage, female seclusion from decision making et al. Few rural women own or control land and this handicaps them in the face of poverty. She is a victim of not just these circumstances, but of social attitudes.

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