‘Emissaries of Empowerment’ – paper

by Kate Cronin-Furman, Nimmi Gowrinathan , & Rafia Zakaria

The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, The City College of New York

What’s the problem with chickens and sewing machines?
We argue that they are hallmarks of an approach that fails to grapple with non-
Western women as full subjects and instead collapses their identity to the
circumstances of their victimhood. Empowerment programming is explicitly

depoliticizing, obscuring women’s relationships to power and the state.

 

A must-read article on how the idea of ’empowering’ women from the Global South has become precisely not about that … Read the article here

 

 

 

Declaration of Asia-Pacific Women Farmers

We are women farmer leaders from 13 countries gathered here for the Asia Pacific Women Farmers Forum, held October 4-6, 2017 in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Here we discussed about the initiatives we take to reduce poverty and hunger in our families and communities, the challenges and obstacles we face as we perform our roles in society development and the strategies and actions we want to implement to fully achieve our potentials as key stakeholders in sustainable development.

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Enterprising woman farmer charts a path to prosperity

From Village Square, author

“More income with less seeds? We’ve been farming for generations. Never have I heard anything so crazy,” her husband mocked. “I convinced him and planted the seeds in five gunthas. Unlike the 100 kg we used to get with the traditional method, I harvested 250 kg, that too at a much lower expense,” she told VillageSquare.in. “Now for anything related to agriculture, he seeks my advice,” she adds with a laugh.

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Why a Filmmaker Left Behind the Glitz & Glam of the Industry to Take up Farming in a Village

From: thebetterindia.com, author: Manabi Katoch “I can’t have right to tell the youth of the villages to stop migrating while I continue to enjoy the city life. So I opted to stay here and become a part of their life,” says Saraswati Kavula.

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These Brave Women Running Rural India

By Moin Qazi, Daily O (See original article)

Women are the mainstay of small-scale agriculture, the farm labour force and day-to-day family subsistence. The biggest myth is that the rural woman is part of her land’s wealth. Yes, but only to the extent of generating it. They don’t own land but produce secondary crops, gather food and firewood, process, store and prepare family food and fetch water for the family.

On average, women spend about twice as much time as men doing the unpaid work that makes life possible for everyone, like cooking, cleaning and caring. As a result, women have no time to finish their education, learn new skills. The fact that the potential of so many women is going unrealised is a tragedy – but it’s also an opportunity. Girls and women aren’t just the faces of the poverty; they’re also the key to overcoming it.

The Indian woman has moved out from the kitchen, only to be shackled by other obstructions such as inheritances laws for agricultural land in favour of men, preference for sons, patrilocal marriage, female seclusion from decision making et al. Few rural women own or control land and this handicaps them in the face of poverty. She is a victim of not just these circumstances, but of social attitudes.

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Seeds of Success

By Chris Hufstader, Oxfam America (See original post)

Khek Koeu must have been having trouble sleeping at night. Underneath her house were stacks of rice in 50-kilogram bags. She and her daughter grew about a third of it, and they bought the rest after the last harvest. They will sell it later, hopefully at a profit. All in all, it’s worth about $18,000—leaving enough money for Koeu to invest in building a metal fence around her house and yard, with a gate she can lock.

Despite her worry about thieves, having enough rice to lock up is a nice problem for Koeu, a 55-year-old widow in Cambodia’s Pursat province. She says she is now making more money, and growing more rice, since she learned to apply what’s known as the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) in 2010. In the past six years, she says, she has finished paying for college for all three of her children, and she bought them all motorbikes. “It’s hard to afford all this,” Koeu says. “In the years before we started SRI we had a lot of difficulties

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Those invisible farm hands

From India Water Portal: http://www.indiawaterportal.org/articles/those-invisible-farm-hands

By: Aarti Kelkar-Khambete

Parvati, aged 40, is an agricultural labourer working on the outskirts of Pune. The sole breadwinner of her family, she has not been going for work for three days because of severe pain in the lower back. She asks me for some pills or ointments that could relieve her of her backache. “I go for weeding and need to stay bent through the day. I walk back home after five and then do all the housework. Else, who will do it for me?” she asks.

Agriculture, an increasingly female activity

Agriculture is undergoing a radical change in India with more and more rural men migrating to bigger cities for work, leaving women, children and elderly behind to take care of the land and agriculture. This puts extra burden on women who have their hands full already with household chores.[1] Surveys say that almost 75 percent of women, as compared to 59 percent men, work in the agricultural sector in India [2] and in many parts of India, women generate their income through agricultural activities [3].

“We come by the bus provided by the owner. It takes around 2.5 hours for us to reach here. We need to finish all our work at home, and come here at 9am and work till 5pm. It gets almost dark by the time we reach home. It is hard work but how can we complain? We get Rs 150 per day,” says 43-year-old Sangeeta, another agricultural labourer who works on the same farm as Parvati.

From being cultivators earlier, more women farmers are turning labourers indicating the growing distress in Indian agriculture where families are finding it difficult to hold on to their lands [4]. The census classifies an agricultural labourer as “a person who works on another person’s land for wages in money or kind or share. He or she has no right of lease or contract on land on which she/he works”.[5] Sixty three percent of women in India are agricultural labourers, dependent on the farms of others [4]. In the case of women working on their own farms, it is mainly the men of the house who own the land.

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