Declaration of Asia-Pacific Women Farmers

We are women farmer leaders from 13 countries gathered here for the Asia Pacific Women Farmers Forum, held October 4-6, 2017 in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Here we discussed about the initiatives we take to reduce poverty and hunger in our families and communities, the challenges and obstacles we face as we perform our roles in society development and the strategies and actions we want to implement to fully achieve our potentials as key stakeholders in sustainable development.

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Enterprising woman farmer charts a path to prosperity

From Village Square, author

“More income with less seeds? We’ve been farming for generations. Never have I heard anything so crazy,” her husband mocked. “I convinced him and planted the seeds in five gunthas. Unlike the 100 kg we used to get with the traditional method, I harvested 250 kg, that too at a much lower expense,” she told VillageSquare.in. “Now for anything related to agriculture, he seeks my advice,” she adds with a laugh.

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A Champion organic SRI farmer in Cambodia

Ms. Nhem Sovannary, a farmer in Po Preah Sang village, Taphem commune, Tramkak district, Takeo province, was awarded first prize in 2013 and third prize in 2014 during the SRI national competitions, organized by CEDAC. She has 1.5 ha of rice fields, 800 m2 homegarden, 8 cattle, 100 chickens and a biogas.

Read the full article on the ALISEA

It’s the Most Vulnerable Who Are Hit First and Worst

We used to think about the impacts of global warming as something happening in the distant future. But the reality is that communities around the world are dealing with it today.

From Ethiopia to Bangladesh, from Peru to our own Gulf Coast, we have witnessed the shocking damage from droughts, floods, and extreme weather associated with climate change. And as the devastation of hurricanes Katrina and Sandy have shown right here in the United States, it’s the poorest and most vulnerable who are hit first and worst.

Women are particularly vulnerable, as they often have access to less education and fewer resources, making it more difficult for them to cope when disaster does strike.

 

Read the full article on the Huffington Post

 

Woman farmer honoured for record rice yield

As part of a drive to encourage farmers to adopt the system of rice intensification (SRI) technique of paddy cultivation, District Collector C. Samayamoorthy on Monday honoured a woman farmer from the district who had won a national award for having achieved a record yield.

The woman farmer T. Amalarani of Vasudevanallur in the district, who harvested 18,143 kg of paddy per hectare under the SRI technique, bagged the Union Government’s ‘Krishi Karman Award’ carrying the cash prize of Rs. 1 lakh and received it from President Pranab Mukherjee in New Delhi on January 15.

Read the original on The Hindu

SRI is changing lives in India’s heartland

When Anil Verma’s PRAN (Preservation and Proliferation of Rural Resources and Nature) approached paddy growing women farmers in Gaya district of Bihar, asking them to try SRI (System of Root Intensification) in their fields, he was met with disdainful looks. It sounded too good to be true, especially to farmers who had been growing paddy for generations. One lady, Kunti Devi, stood up and agreed to try it (‘Out of pity for us’, Anil says). Kunti Devi was given a tiny plot of land by the Government of Bihar, but it was barely enough to grow what she needed. After trying SRI, the results from her field were amazing, with her paddy crop getting record yields. She had surplus cash and was finally able to send her children to school.

Read more from the original article on The Alternative

 

A system of rice intensification has changed my life

In 2012, Oxfam working with a partner RUDI – Rural Urban Development Initiatives trained Pili on modern rice production techniques, mostly referred to as system of rice intensification. The training emphasized on the use of improved seeds with high yield, proper plant spacing, proper farm management particularly weeding and application of fertilizers.

Pili utilized the knowledge in her farming activities and as a result she has increased her rice yield three-fold.

Read the full Oxfam article here