Eradicating Poverty From India: Here’s One Interesting Approach That Is Working!

from thebetterindia.com

Kumari Bai and her family hail from Debgaon, a village in Chattisgarh. Two persistent problems that the villagers were facing were lack of sustained year-long food security and low income from agricultural produce.

Kumari Bai was exposed to the benefits of implementing a ‘System of Root Intensification’ (SRI) to all crops, which helped her generate better yields.

This method incorporated traditional methods known to the farmers with modern technologies for better and a more sustained approach.

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‘Emissaries of Empowerment’ – paper

by Kate Cronin-Furman, Nimmi Gowrinathan , & Rafia Zakaria

The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, The City College of New York

What’s the problem with chickens and sewing machines?
We argue that they are hallmarks of an approach that fails to grapple with non-
Western women as full subjects and instead collapses their identity to the
circumstances of their victimhood. Empowerment programming is explicitly

depoliticizing, obscuring women’s relationships to power and the state.

 

A must-read article on how the idea of ’empowering’ women from the Global South has become precisely not about that … Read the article here

 

 

 

Declaration of Asia-Pacific Women Farmers

We are women farmer leaders from 13 countries gathered here for the Asia Pacific Women Farmers Forum, held October 4-6, 2017 in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Here we discussed about the initiatives we take to reduce poverty and hunger in our families and communities, the challenges and obstacles we face as we perform our roles in society development and the strategies and actions we want to implement to fully achieve our potentials as key stakeholders in sustainable development.

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Enterprising woman farmer charts a path to prosperity

From Village Square, author

“More income with less seeds? We’ve been farming for generations. Never have I heard anything so crazy,” her husband mocked. “I convinced him and planted the seeds in five gunthas. Unlike the 100 kg we used to get with the traditional method, I harvested 250 kg, that too at a much lower expense,” she told VillageSquare.in. “Now for anything related to agriculture, he seeks my advice,” she adds with a laugh.

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Why a Filmmaker Left Behind the Glitz & Glam of the Industry to Take up Farming in a Village

From: thebetterindia.com, author: Manabi Katoch “I can’t have right to tell the youth of the villages to stop migrating while I continue to enjoy the city life. So I opted to stay here and become a part of their life,” says Saraswati Kavula.

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These Brave Women Running Rural India

By Moin Qazi, Daily O (See original article)

Women are the mainstay of small-scale agriculture, the farm labour force and day-to-day family subsistence. The biggest myth is that the rural woman is part of her land’s wealth. Yes, but only to the extent of generating it. They don’t own land but produce secondary crops, gather food and firewood, process, store and prepare family food and fetch water for the family.

On average, women spend about twice as much time as men doing the unpaid work that makes life possible for everyone, like cooking, cleaning and caring. As a result, women have no time to finish their education, learn new skills. The fact that the potential of so many women is going unrealised is a tragedy – but it’s also an opportunity. Girls and women aren’t just the faces of the poverty; they’re also the key to overcoming it.

The Indian woman has moved out from the kitchen, only to be shackled by other obstructions such as inheritances laws for agricultural land in favour of men, preference for sons, patrilocal marriage, female seclusion from decision making et al. Few rural women own or control land and this handicaps them in the face of poverty. She is a victim of not just these circumstances, but of social attitudes.

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